Inconsistency Breeds Illness

Inconsistency Breeds IllnessThere is hardly a day at the school that I do not see someone work up a sweat and then walk out into the cold weather wearing flip-flops, shorts, and a jacket hastily thrown over their sweat drenched shirt. Additionally there is hardly a week when some percentage of the students are out with illness, and often these are the same folk that weeks before set their smarts aside and tested their metal against germs.

Fortunately, through genetics, or I think effort, I am rarely sick. I work at it. I try to avoid folk who are ill, and do the little things doctors say we should do, such as washing my hands and taking vitamins, along with a few others.

It does not matter how big or strong you are. It does not matter how hard you work out. Germs, bacteria, viruses are stronger than even the mightiest among us. While they are stronger, as human beings we are supposedly smarter. However, I am amazed at how vulnerable some people make themselves to these dumb nano-mites. You can flex your huge pecs, displaying your strength. Germs only laugh at that.

The mammalian body likes consistency. Centuries ago central heating was developed, not to make us hot, but to ward off the cold, to give us a more consistent environment to live in. For long centuries we used porches and verandas, shade and fans to ward off the heat of summer. As soon as technology advanced enough we developed air conditioning. What a pronounced term, conditioned air, as if nothing could be more telling. We did so not to make us cold, but to give us a conditioned, consistent environment.

Look at our furry little companions. Give them some new food and invariably they will turn their nose up at it. If you give them nothing else, forcing them to change their diet, you will be given a host of little presents all about your house. The body likes things to be to be known, predictable.

Many athletes and fitness folk work for that ‘burn.’ They want to work up a sweat. Yet current research shows that lowering the core temperature actually improves recovery time, strength, and endurance. The body prefers that things hold constant. Those pesky germs bear this out. They like living in us because it is a rather consistent environment, at least until they make you ill and you get a fever, raising the inner temperature and upsetting the little buggers until they die.

You may think you are tough and strong, and scoff at the weather as you walk out to your cold car wearing the same sweaty shorts that you worked out in. Your body fights to balance the temperature, stealing resources from other bodily aspects such as awareness and inner defenses. The germs shout, ‘Yippee! The human’s strength is lessening. The antibodies are retreating. Time for a growth spurt.’ Before you know it, you are sniffling, coughing, and bang! You get to skip the next week of training.

I arrive at school carrying my work out clothes. I leave the school carrying my work out clothes. You should take a moment to cool down. Get out of your sweaty clothes. Okay, you may be a little wet when you climb into your dry street clothes, but your entire body will be more protected. Okay, so your street clothes will get stinky, but that is what wash is for.

I am bald, not by choice. I have learned to always wear a hat, even in the summer at times. Sunburn isn’t fun. But especially in the winter you must protect your noggin. Even if you have wonderful, flowing locks, there is sweat in there. Dry off, and use a lid to keep the heat in.

Long centuries ago humans learned to clothe themselves against the elements. How silly that so many forget that now. If you treat your body to inconsistency, you may be constantly ill.

Sifu Keith Mosher

About Sifu Keith Mosher

My new book, "Astro Boy, Sensei, and Me" is available now, as is my Sci-Fi joy ride, "On a Sphere's Edge". I have a Bachelor of Media Arts degree from USC. I have been an Audio Producer / Engineer, a Law Office Manager, and I am currently an Author and a Martial Arts Instructor.
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